How does wilderness make you feel?

If you found your way to this humble wee blog, I’m gonna kick off by guessing that we share something in common.

How Wilderness makes me feel (Mt Feathertop, Victorian High Country, Australia).

How Wilderness makes me feel (Mt Feathertop, Victorian High Country, Australia).

It’s something that I struggle to put words to sometimes, so it’s not uncommon for me to throw my hands up in surrender and bundle it into the wonderful word that is, “unwordable“.

Sure, there are words in my language that go some way to explain some of the feelings, like the name and sentiment expressed in this song and film clip by Rudimental, called Free.

I love this. Not that I’m about to run out and learn to fly a wing suit, but it’s like they’ve run out of words in language to express a feeling, so have called upon other forms of language, that of music and imagery. In doing so, they’ve come closer than I’ve ever been able to, to describe the feeling that wild places gives me.

I’d love to hear from you about what it is about natural places that draws you back time and time again. The feelings, the emotions, the highs and the lows. Whether it be in the quiet of a still mountaintop or the rush of a pounding waterfall… What is it for you?

 

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Comments

  1. Shona Hamilton says

    Centred. The wilderness makes me feel like I belong to something that is much bigger than me. In the wilderness I can locate myself, in the physical and in the mental. It gives me strength and a sense of peace.

  2. says

    Ha ha, Love your blog :) I watch that film clip almost every day…. that’s the only way to describe it, totally free. Out there, nothing else matters… bills, worries, accomplishments, failures, stresses, they all melt away and you can just ‘be’.

  3. says

    Hiking makes me feel alive. It’s much easier to be in the moment in the wilderness than in front of the TV! I love the photos of you looking so exhilarated. It’s funny because, when I’m sitting at my desk daydreaming about the next hike, I always think I’ll feel like doing that pose (hands up in the air, smile on my face) – but when I get there I usually find I’m glad to have a rest and eat!

    • says

      Ha Lucinda. You make me laugh… don’t worry… those exhilaration photos only happen after I’ve caught my breath and the sweat has started to dry! I’m no super woman :-) But I have had this photo hanging in my office for the past 8 years and whenever the computer has had my attention for too long, I look at that pic and remind myself of that feeling.

  4. Pablo Scodellaro says

    It is the feeling of being back at home and being a child again.
    The home where our human DNA was born.
    The home where mankind, in it’s infancy, discovered everything around at its own pace.

  5. says

    Hi Caro – love your stuff, but a bit miffed that we guys can’t do the last post’s sock warming thing.

    On top of a high hill, above the tree line, makes me feel like a soaring eagle. I’m usually down in the lowlands scrub flapping around like an old chook.

    Cheers. john

    • says

      Ah John, nothing wrong with flapping around like an old chook – nice analogy of life though – the highs and lows… Oh and I can’t see why blokes can’t warm their socks inside their chests before bedtime… it could add to the evenings entertainment around the fire!

  6. says

    Wilderness/Hiking makes me feel at peace. After hiking for so long now, I almost feel uncomfortable back in urban life…. Masses of people/traffic/traffic lights/urban rush….. Im movie to the forest……

    • says

      I relate Noel… peace and the then experiencing the jarring effect of coming back into urban life. Too much of everything. I remember coming out of the wilderness after 12 days and being able to smell the perfumes and chemicals in everyone’s soap, shampoo and other products, whilst still standing 5 metres from them. After using no products for that long, I was actually smelling nature and not modern life…
      … I can only imagine how I smelt to them! :-)

  7. says

    I love how small I feel when I’m out in nature. I feel physically small, my problems and worries feel small, and I feel in awe of the details and life surrounded by me :)

  8. says

    Yes, free, that’s just it… and connected to the entire planet and universe and clean, cleansed and refreshed… and it doesn’t happen often enough! There’s a song I love called “Big Country’ by the eponymous Scottish band and it always takes me straight back to the Highlands and the Western Isles and that feeling of rain-washed freshness and freedom. Good to meet you at PB.

  9. says

    The feeling of connecting to nature, the sounds/smell/touch of nature and how it fills your senses.

    I happen to be a Naturist, meaning I enjoy going naked in nature and I have been hiking/skinny dipping in the wilderness since I was about 13 years old, so I really know how it feels to connect to nature.

    I often get asked by people what the attraction is to getting naked in nature and to be honest it’s hard to explain because I have been doing it so long it just come naturally.

    But I do know that I am addicted to the feeling of the sun on my skin and the wind blowing over my body.

    you can read an article I wrote for the BushwalkingBlog here: http://www.bushwalkingblog.com.au/guest-post-nude-hiking-whats-it-all-about/

    Michael

    • says

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts and experiences Michael. I confess to also being a bit fond of a nudey swim in remote places. I became a bit of a convert in Kakadu many years ago. There definitely is something about it and something that connects the physical to the mental and emotional.

  10. tintbum says

    It takes me away from the filth and rubbish I see, the noise of politicians endless blaming, I see no strife, no images flash up on a TV of maniacs and war. Everything is as it should be. In harmony, in balance and it’s so at peace with its self, and I love to surround myself in the quietness of it all.

  11. Mick says

    Having spent my childhood exploring the ku ring gai chase national park, going bush to me is like going home. Its where I belong.

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